Literature of antiquity and the Middle Ages - Summary 2019 year

Bhavabhuti (the first half of the VIII century)

The Last Acts of Rama (Uttara-rama-carita) - A play in poems and prose, based on the contents of the last book Ramayana

Releasing Sit out of Lancashire and killing her the abductor of the demon king Ravan, Rama and his wife return to Ayodhya, where the days of their life are now serene and happy. On one such day, Sita and Rama inspect a picture gallery, on many of whose paintings they captured their fate. The sad events of the past alternate in pictures with joyful, tears in the eyes of the spouses are replaced by a smile, until the weary Sita, once again worn out, does not fall asleep on the hands of the thrown Rama. And just at this moment, the king's servant Durmukha appears, who reports of dissatisfaction among the people who reproach Rama for accepting him back to his wife, tarnishing his honor with the presence of the king of the demons in the house. The duty of a loving spouse, confident in the purity and fidelity of Sita, requires Rama to despise false suspicions, but the duty of the sovereign, the ideal of which is Rama, orders him to expel Sita, who stirred up the grumbling of his subjects. And Rama - like it's bitter for him - is forced to order his brother Lakshman to take Sita out into the woods.
Twelve years old. From the story of the Forest Nymph of Vasanty, we find out that Sita went into exile for a pregnant woman and soon gave birth to two twins, Kushu and Lava, who had been raised in their abode by the sage of Valmiki; that she was taken under the patronage of the goddess of the Earth and the Ganges River, and the river and forest nymphs became her friends; and that, with all this, it is constantly tormented by the offense of Rama, and the longing for him. Meanwhile, in the forest of Dandaku, where Sita lives, to punish a certain apostate who could serve others as a bad example, Rama comes. The surroundings of Dandaki are known to him by a long expulsion to the forest with Sita and awaken agony memories of him. In the same way as before, Rama's distant mountains seem to be, from which, as then, the screams of parrots are heard; all the same humus covered with shrubs, where the springy hills jump; Just as tenderly something whispers whispering the cane of the river bank. But before, Sita was next to him, and the king noted with sadness that not only his life diminished, but the run of time had already dried up the riverbed, the lush crowns of trees, the birds and the animals looked cowardly and wary. The frame pours out its grief in the bitter complaints that hears, leaning over Rama, the invisible Sita for him. She is convinced that Ram, as well as she, suffers severely, only by touching her hand twice saves him from deep fainting, and gradually indignation is replaced by her pity and resentment - by love. Even before the upcoming reconciliation with Rama, she confesses to herself that the "sting of shameful exile" is pulled out of her heart. The lush crowns of trees have been distorted, birds and animals look bold and alert. The frame pours out its grief in the bitter complaints that hears, leaning over Rama, the invisible Sita for him. She is convinced that Ram, as well as she, suffers severely, only by touching her hand twice saves him from deep fainting, and gradually indignation is replaced by her pity and resentment - by love. Even before the upcoming reconciliation with Rama, she confesses to herself that the "sting of shameful exile" is pulled out of her heart. The lush crowns of trees have been distorted, birds and animals look bold and alert. The frame pours out its grief in the bitter complaints that hears, leaning over Rama, the invisible Sita for him. She is convinced that Ram, as well as she, suffers severely, only by touching her hand twice saves him from deep fainting, and gradually indignation is replaced by her pity and resentment - by love. Even before the upcoming reconciliation with Rama, she confesses to herself that the "sting of shameful exile" is pulled out of her heart. and gradually indignation is replaced by her pity, the offense is love. Even before the upcoming reconciliation with Rama, she confesses to herself that the "sting of shameful exile" is pulled out of her heart. and gradually indignation is replaced by her pity, the offense is love. Even before the upcoming reconciliation with Rama, she confesses to herself that the "sting of shameful exile" is pulled out of her heart.
After a while, the father of Sita Janaka and mother of Rama Kaushalya meet a boy who is amazingly like Sita in the hermits. This boy is really one of the sons of Sita and Ram - Lava. Following Lava appears son Lakshmana Chandraket, accompanying the sacred horse, which according to the custom of the royal sacrifice - aswamedhi should roam around the year, where he will think, designating the boundaries of royal possessions. Lava boldly tries to block the horse's path, and Chandraket, although he experiences unconscious kinship sympathy with a stranger, joins him in a duel. The match interrupts the nearby Rama. In excitement Rama looks at the lines of Lava, reminding him of Sita and himself in his youth. He asks him who he is, where he came from and who his mother is, and Lava leaves Ramah into the palace of Valmiki to answer all his questions.
Valmicks offer Rama, as well as Lakshmana, relatives of Rama and his subjects, to watch his play about Rama's life. Roles are played by gods and demigods, and in the course of a play in which the past is always intertwined with the present, the innocence and purity of Sita, the fidelity of Ram to the royal and marital duty, the depth and inviolability of their mutual love are firmly established. Convinced by the divine representation, the people enthusiastically praise Sita, and finally, her complete and final reconciliation with Rama takes place.